Jacob Mast 1738-1808

From: Mast, Christian Z., A brief history of Bishop Jacob Mast and other Mast pioneers; and a complete genealogical family register and those related by intermarriage, with biographies of their descendants from the earliest available records to the present time; 1911. http://archive.org/details/briefhistoryofbi00mast

Life Sketch of Bishop Jacob Mast

Bishop Jacob Mast was born in 1738 in Switzerland, Europe, of Swiss parents. He immigrated to America an orphan boy in company with his four sisters and younger brother John, all were in care of their benevolent uncle Johannes Mast, whom we have no record of his remaining days in this country, by tradition he was an aged widower or bachelor, and was presumably buried on the farm now owned by Mr. George D. Fahrenbach of Penn Twp., Berks Co., Pa. The old cemetery is in a dilapidated condition, by which a new barn has been erected, almost covering the whole burial plot.

Signatures

Signatures

The above is a true tracing of the names Johannes Mast, Andreas and Michael Holly as written on the original Immigrant List, Now on file in Division of Public Records, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The following record of their emigration is in evidence:

Rotterdam Harbor, 1750

Rotterdam Harbor, 1750

Harrisburg, Penna.
Mar. 13, 1911.

To whom it may concern:
I hereby certify that the above is a true tracing of the above names as written on the original Immigration List. Ship, Brotherhood, Captain, John Thomson. Date, Nov. 3, 1750. Sailed from Rotterdam and last from Cowes, and arrived at Philadelphia. Now on file in Division of Public Records, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

(Signed) Luther R. Kelker.
Custodian of the Public Records of the Pennsylvania State Library.
(The seal of the Department of the State Public Records is affixed to the document).

Northkill Amish

Northkill Amish

The party had sailed from Rotterdam in the ship Brotherhood, John Thompson, Captain, landing in Philadelphia, Pa., on Nov. 3, 1750. They selected their home near the site of the Blue Mountains, tradition says. All other early Amish Mennonites formed their first settlement in America at this place, which was known for nearly a century as the “Northkill congregation.” The early members had located in Heidelberg, Lower Heidelberg, North Heidleberg, Penn, Bern, Upper Bern, Center, Upper Tulpehocken and Jefferson townships, Berks Co., Pa. The majority had lived in the vicinity of the Schuylkill River between Irish Creek and Northkill, where they had opened out farms, From 1754 to 1764 and even at a later period the settlement was exposed and almost exterminated by the torch, hatchet and scalping knife of the savages, and their midnight assault and slaughter.” Hundreds fell victims to the relentlessly cruel savages, along the Blue mountains south and north of it, and along the Susquehanna, as far north as Penn’s Creek.

John Jacob Hochstetler

John Jacob Hochstetler House

Among the massacred were many Germans—more than three hundred in all. including such as Hochstetler, Miller, Hartman, Hellman and Schleich which are family names popularly known in this history. Bishop Jacob Mast and his new life companion and father-in-law, Michael Holly, who had immigrated to America on the same vessel with the remaining members of the Mast family had now resided nearly ten years in the district of the Northkill congregation of Amish Mennonites. While thus in 1760 they were attacked by Indians and forced to seek another asylum from persecution by settling in Conestoga Valley, on a fertile tract of land forming the watershed between the Schuylkill river and the few larger tributaries of the beautiful Conestoga Creek, which name bears the signification of an Indian tribe, while on its banks are still found numerous Indian relics, such as darts and tomahawks.

Chester, PA Mennonite Church, 1881

Chester, PA Mennonite Church, 1881

A warrant was granted to Bishop Jacob Mast and a certain John Holly, Nov. 19, 1764, and the latter on Apr. 13, 1769 lawfully discharged all the rights and half part of the land to the former. The tract contained 170 acres and an allowance of six per cent for roads which was situated partly in the counties of Berks and Chester. It was purchased from Samuel Martin of Tredyfrin township, Chester Co., Pa., for £325.

Jacob Mast home

Jacob Mast home

On this tract of land Bishop Jacob Mast erected a comfortable log farm house, close to a lusty spring which flows directly from a stratum of limeless sandstone.

Jacob Mast Residence

Jacob Mast Residence (after log home)

His brother John wandered through the wilderness to Randolph Co., N. C., which the reader may notice a brief account of his lineal descendants contained in the latter part of this volume and also a sketch of his sister Magdalena. The other three sisters are supposed to have died unmarried and buried near the spot of our progenitor, representing marked graves without inscriptions.

Making Hay

Making Hay

Here the once and again persecuted and oppressed Swiss family, separated from friends and much that makes life agreeable, hoped to unmolestedly begin the world anew. Here, surrounded on all sides by several clans of Indians they located in the gloomy, silent shades of a virgin forest, whose undisturbed solitude was yet uncheered by the murmurs of the honey bee, or the twitterings of the swallow, those never-failing attendants upon the woodman’s ax. For the hum and warblings of those, they had not only the shout and song of the tawny sons of the forest, but also the nocturnal bowlings of the ever watchful dog, baying at the sheeny queen of night as she moved stately on, reflecting her borrowed light. By way of variety, we imagine their ears were nightly greeted by the shrill, startling whoop of the owl or the crickets wail in the contiguous thickets.

Conestoga Mennonite Church, 1946

Conestoga Mennonite Church, 1946

Presumably the Mast family were the first Amish Mennonite settlers to establish and organize a congregation of its kind in Conestoga valley which was the third settlement and the first permanent one in America. It is still known as the “Conestoga congregation.” Bishop Jacob Mast was elected to his office in 1788, was well educated for the times, and was a man of extensive influence. He always visited the various congregations on horseback, riding through dense forests, over great mountains and fording swelling streams, in which his life was also endangered by the red man of the forest. Yet he was in every way adapted to this situation.

Conestoga Mennonite Church, 1948

Conestoga Mennonite Church, 1948

His preparation was of the best order; and being undoubtedly driven from his native land by religious persecution, he must have rejoiced in finding such a pleasing situation, such inviting conditions. He knew the suffering of his forefathers through the days of martyrdom, his uncertain condition in his native land, and thus a sense of well-being induced his uncle Johannes to leave with him and his brother and four sisters. But in leaving the valley and the beautiful mountain scenery of Switzerland so dear to him, he came to possess and enjoy a country equally favored for beauty, for health and for profit; and it was more highly favored in respect to a condition which was to him more
important than all others combined —- freedom. He was sound, hopeful and trustful in religious convictions, which had fitted him admirably for his vocation.

Casselman Mennonite Church, 1948.

Castleman Mennonite Church, 1948.

He made many visits to his congregations, at least semi-annually, of which there were three located in Somerset and Cambria counties, Pennsylvania, known as “Gladyes,” “Conemaugh” and “Castleman’s River,” two in Chester county, Pennsylvania, (called Chester Valley and Compassville), two in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania (called Conestoga and Pequeau), and three in Berks Co., Pennsylvania —- one in Cumru, one in Maiden Creek and the third in Bern township (called Northkill).

PA Counties

PA Counties

The Mast family in America have sprung from an ancestry whose lines are well marked as far as they can be traced. These lines however are mainly found within the limits of agricultural industry, genuine morality and sincere earnestness in the performance of the duties of the Christian religion, coupled with a firm faith in its saving power. There are only several incidents where fame of arms-bearing or military skill was ever attached to any bearing the name of Mast.

Mennonites

Mennonites

The records of American history are practically silent and have little knowledge of the name. But the records of the Christian Church, especially of that branch of it known as the Amish Mennonite Church, are alive with the names of pioneers and heroes in the several generations of Masts that have lived since the establishment of the Church in America. First and foremost among these stands the name Jacob Mast, whom fancy pictures as a tall man, having a large and well-proportioned frame, very muscular, with light hair and blue eyes, a face indicating great firmness and resolution, and a body capable of enduring great hardships. How nearly this fancied representation of him may correspond with truth, cannot be said. But of this there is proof, that he was of great mental and moral force, practiced simplicity in attire, being a faithful and zealous servant for his Master and did much to advance the interests of his church.

Jacob Mast 1738-1808, Pine Grove Cemetery

Jacob Mast 1738-1808, Pine Grove Cemetery

In the year 1808 he gave up the wonderfully busy life when in the same year his neighbors carried his body out of his old home and buried it in a quiet spot on the broad acres he had tended and loved. His grave is marked with a carved sandstone bearing inscription near the northwest corner of the wall of what is known as Pine Grove Cemetery. His wife, Magdalene Holly, died Oct. 26, 1820, aged 80 years, and is buried by his side.

Their children had strong constitutions and in general had good health and lead temperate, moral, honest Christian lives and imparted these same good qualities to their children and grand-children, for which give God the glory. During their childhood days they were commanded hefore retiring at night to all repeat our Lord’s Prayer in concert.

(1) John Mast, m. to Mary Kurtz.
(2) Magdalena Mast, m. to Christian Zook.
(3) Barbara Mast, m. to John Hochstetler; m. as her second husband, John Zug.
(4) Jacob Mast, m. to Barbara Kenege.
(5) David Mast, m. to Mary Kurtz.
(6) Mary Mast, m. to John Coffman.
(7) Nancy Mast, m. to Adam Kurtz.
(8) Fanny Mast, m. to John Zug.
(9) Elizabeth Mast, m. to Christian Holley.
(10) Christian Mast, m. to Susan Kurtz.
(11) Esther ]Mast, m. to Christian Zug; m. as her second husband, Peter Holley.
(12) Daniel Mast, m. to Charity Zook; m. as his second wife, Catherine Kurtz; as his third wife, Mary Morgan.

Family heads, members of the Amish Mennonite Church.

The will of Jacob Mast and the memorandum account from his will which was written by his own hand in the German language. As there are in it provisions and composition somewhat singular in documents, and as they have lessons of instruction to the sincere Christian, and to a large number of the descendants of the author, they are full of interest and are here– with reproduced in full.

jacob mast sigThe above is a true tracing of the name as written on original manuscript preserved by the author.

As I consider my mortality and feel my weakness and imbecility, but of a good understanding, I have proposed to myself under the assistance of God to make my Will.

I order also when I die to be buried into the earth from which I came in a Christian manner and my soul I commend to the grace of God, further I order that the house in which we dwell shall be kept in order for my dear and beloved wife.

Menno Simons

Menno Simons[13]

She shall have it for her widow’s seal and she shall have beforehand the farm of two hundred and twenty five pounds to her use so as she want it, of which part of this money shall be one hundred and seventy pounds which I have lent to my son-in-law Peter Holly, thus he shall pay to my widow when she will have it, or to my guardians for her use so as she desires it in her life’s time, further has my widow the right to keep beds, chest and cloth-house and kitchen furniture what she want,further I order that my guardians shall pay the costs of my funeral and burial after they have paid all debts and collected what is to come it shall directly be divided to my twelve children all the property I leave in equal parts,

Mennonite Meetinghouse

Mennonite Meetinghouse

further is my Will that my plantation shall be oversigned to my son Daniel by my two guardians and he shall have it on such price for twenty four hundred pounds shall be the price of the purchase money paid down. Shall be twelve hundred pounds in two parts, when he takes possession of it, he shall give five hundred pounds and to have one hundred pounds in the place, the other six hundred pounds shall remain till his mother is dead, then shall he give five hundred pounds to his eleven brothers and sisters one hundred has he in the plantation the payments shall be one hundred pounds a year, he shall pay them to his brothers and sisters according to their age,

Horse and Buggy

Horse and Buggy

first to Hannes, next to Magdalena, and Barbara and Jacob and David and Maria and Anna and Freni and Elizabeth and Christen and Esther, the maintenance for my reliot widow shall be given hearty out of the plantation by my son Daniel such shall be, twelve bushels of wheat, three bushels of buckwheat, two bushels of Indian corn that shall he bring to the mill and fetch the flour home, one milk cow he shall keep in feed and pasture with his own, the flesh of a fat swine and fifty weight but and fifteen pounds combed flax and the tow of it, five pounds of wool she shall have,

further if there is any, chickens and eggs she shall have, further shall she have the fire wood splitted and brought to the house if she desires it, the payments shall begin one year after he takes possession, one hundred pounds shall be paid yearly till the plantation is paid, the last part of the purchase money to be paid down shall be without interest till after the death of his mother.

Amish Farm Country

Amish Farm Country

Further I order my two sons Hannes Mast and Jacob Mast as guardians over my reliot children and widow to take care of her during her life in all her infirmity and necessity, such I declare as my last Will and Testament written in the year of our Lord, one thousand and eight hundred and eight, written and attested before witnesses today the eighteenth January.

Jacob Mast (L. S.)

John Lapp.
Andreas Troyer.

And if anything should be wrong in my will then I give to my executors full power to make it right to give deeds as if I was present myself as witnesses.

Jacob Mast (L. S.)

John Lapp.
Andreas Troyer.

Mennonite Publishing Company, 1886

Mennonite Publishing Company, 1886

(Memoranda from the will of Jacob Mast, as translated from the original German by Emil Max Leube and E. Bruce Alexander, attorney at law of Belleville, Penna., on the 30th day of December, A. D. 1909).

Date June 17th, 1787, my son John Mast got married, and I the father, Jacob Mast gave on that day to my son —- One bed with covers, one chest, two cows and one heifer, at the cost of nine pounds in money, one hog, at one pound and five shillings, one horse at fifteen pounds, one saddle at two pounds, one mattock at nine shillings, one wagon at seven pounds, two sheep and three lambs at one pound, five bushels of wheat at five dollars, one new plow with clevis at two pounds and ten shillings, and also gave him in cash one hundred pounds.

Making Hay

Making Hay

Date, November 2, 1783, my daughter Magdalena Mast got married to Christian Zook, and I, Jacob Mast gave her that day. Three pounds in money, one kettle and two crocks, two pans, at the cost of two pounds and ten shillings, cooking utensils at eleven shillings, spoons one dozen at five shillings and six pence, one chisel, at two shillings, one chest, one bed with two covers, two sheep and one lamb, five bushels of wheat, and one sack at twelve shillings, and on Mar. 10th, 1791, Christian Zook got in money one hundred pounds.

Funeral Procession

Funeral Procession

Date, June, 17th, 1788, my daughter, Barbara Mast got married to John Hochstetler, and I, Jacob Mast gave her that day, one kettle, crocks and pans, at two pounds and plates and cups, at one pound, four shillings and ten pence, one hog at two pounds and four shillings, pewter ware, at sixteen shillings and eight pence, one bed at eighteen shillings, one bed with two covers, one cow, one heifer, two sheep, one lamb, and one chest, and on April 3d, 1792, John Hochstetler got one hundred pounds in money, and also got the money for five bushels of wheat which John Hochstetler acknowledged.

Pine Grove Cemetery

Pine Grove Cemetery

Date, February, 6th, 1791, my daughter Mary Mast got married to John Coffman and I, Jacob Mast, gave her that day, One chest, one bed with two covers, one kettle at one pound four shillings, pans and meat fork, at one pound two shillings and six pence, pewter ware, at eighteen shillings, one bed at eighteen shillings, one cow, one calf, one heifer and two sheep, and one lamb, one dollar for crockery ware, four dollars for wooden ware and cooking utensils, and on the 2d, of May 1793. I gave John Coffman one hundred pounds in money and five dollars for wheat.

Old Order Mennonites

Mennonites

Date, April, 22d, 1792, my son Jacob Mast got married, and I, Jacob Mast gave to his housekeeping, one horse at fifteen pounds, one cow, one heifer, two sheep, one lamb, two hogs at fifteen pounds, one wagon at eleven pounds and five shillings, five bushels of wheat, one saddle at two pounds, also a new plow, and on May the 2d, I gave Jacob for his farm land one hundred pounds in money, and in 1804 I paid for one horse four pounds, also one horse at fifteen pounds.

Buggy, Chester, PA

Buggy, Chester, PA

Date, January, 13th, 1793, my daughter Anna Mast got married to Adam Kurtz, and I, Jacob Mast gave her for housekeeping, one bed at one pound, one bed with two covers, one cow, one heifer, and wooden ware, at cne pound and one shilling and six pence, iron pots and pans, at one pound and sixteen shillings, pewter ware, at one pound one shilling and seven pence, one chest, two sheep, two hogs, at two dollars, cooking kettle at five dollars, stone ware at one dollar, one stallion at fifty pounds, and on March the 8th, 1794 gave Adam Kurtz fifty pounds in money.

Mennonites in U.S.

Mennonites in U.S.

Date, November, 20th, 1796, my daughter Freni Mast got married to John Zook, and I, Jacob Mast gave to her for housekeeping, one chest, one bed, one bed with two covers, also kettle and pans, cooking spoons, pewter ware, one dozen of spoons, wash tub and bucket, butter churn, one cow and one heifer, three dollars for sheep, two dollars for a goat, I gave John Zook one hundred pounds in money, and also gave him for his share of wheat the money.

Book Title

Book Title Page

Date. January, 13th, 1709, my daughter Elizabeth Mast got married to Christian Hooley, and I, Jacob Mast gave her for housekeeping, one chest, one bed, one bed with two covers, kettles, pots and pans, cooking spoon, pewter ware, one dozen of spoons, also wash tub and bucket, one cow and one heifer, three dollars, for sheep, two dollars for hogs, five dollars for wheat, also gave to Christian Hooley one hundred pounds in money.

Date, November, 5th, 1799, my daughter Esther got married to Christian Zook, and I, Jacob Mast gave to her housekeeping the same as to her other brothers and sisters, and also gave to Christian Zook one hundred pounds in money.

Byerland Mennonite Meeting House, Lancaster, PA

Byerland Mennonite Meeting House, Lancaster, PA

Date, January, 5, 1800, my son Christian Mast got married, and I, Jacob Mast, gave to him the same as to the other children, and I also gave one hundred pounds’ worth of horses and cattle.

Date, 1801, my son David Mast got married, and I gave him the same as his other brothers, and also one hundred pounds in money.

Date, June 15th. 1806, my son Daniel Mast got married, and I gave him the same value as his brothers, and also gave him one hundred pounds’ worth of horses and cattle, Which you will take in acknowledgement.

___________________________
More Info:

  1. Mennonite Church USA Archives’ photostream
  2. Conestoga Mennonite Church
  3. Mennonite Church USA wiki
  4. Mennonite Wiki
  5. Mennonite Community on the Web
  6. About Mennonites
  7. Mennonite Central Committee
  8. A Mennonite blog
  9. Eat Like a Mennonite – NYTimes.com
  10. Mennonite World Conference
  11. A brief history of Bishop Jacob Mast…
  12. Mast, Jacob (1738-1808) Mast, C. Z. “Mast, Jacob (1738-1808).” Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Retrieved 21 May 2013. http://www.gameo.org/encyclopedia/contents/M3789.html.
  13. Menno Simons was a Catholic Priest who grew up in war-torn Friesia (The Netherlands) country in the 1500’s and had questioned the practice of infant baptism and transubstantiation. His followers became known as MennonitesMany have been conscientious objectors to war.

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9 Responses to Jacob Mast 1738-1808

  1. Donovan (Mast) Beyeler says:

    Jay Steel Hackenbracht, your blog posting here is exceptionally well done and is greatly appreciated. Bishop Jacob Mast is my great, great, great grandfather by way of his son Christian Mast married to Susan Kurtz; grandson, Samuel Mast, and great grandson, John Mast of Holmes Co., Ohio. … I have done rather extensive study of my Mast family line back to Hans or Benedikt Mast married to Elsa Alben about 1574. About 6 weeks ago, I was able to video record the home and property thought to have been the home of Jacob Mast, uncle of Bishop Jacob Mast near Hirschhorn/Rüschegg, Switzerland and a valley in Alsace, France where Bishop Jacob Mast’s family had gone to while fugitives from Canton Bern. .. I have a copy on CDs of the birthdays/baptisms of the line of Masts that includes Hans (Johannes) Mast b. abt. 1664 married to Anna Mishler/Mischler parents of children: 1) Johannes b. 1695 (uncle of orphans Bishop Jacob, John to NC, Anna, Magdalena, and two other daughters on ship Brotherhood in 1750), 2) Christian b 1697; Barbara b 1699; Anna b 1704; Jacob b 1705 (emigrant of 1737); Ulrich, born 1710. (The best estimate now is that Christian or possibly, Ulrich may have been the father of Bishop Jacob Mast; not Johannes or Jacob as some suggest.) .. I have also researched the history of John Mast to North Carolina and think that his wife was Catherine Barbara Hermann, not Barbara Harman daughter of Cutliff Harman. … There’s a book to be published soon entitled “Kinship Concealed – Amish Mennonite – African American Family Connections by Sharon Cranford and Dwight Roth and a book signing to be at the Pine Grove Cemetery near Elverson, PA, July 29, 30, and perhaps the 31, 2013.

    • jayhack2012 says:

      Don:
      Thank you for your kind words– you can’t imagine how grateful I am to get your response! Sixteen years ago, my wife and I had our honeymoon in Grantsville, at the Casselman– we always knew it was a very special place. And in 2008, at my uncle’s funeral in Dover, about 3-400 Mennonites stopped by to pay their respect. Also, my aunt related a story to me a week or so ago, about another Jacob Mast, who lived by Walnut Creek, who came downstairs one cold morning to find three indians sleeping by the fireplace! They calmly prepared breakfast for their guests, and made a positive occasion of the unexpected visit.

      We simply must get these stories written down and posted! I would be delighted to post some of your materials.

  2. Donovan (Mast) Beyeler says:

    Many thanks for your reply to my response. There are many persons named Jacob Mast and the one at Walnut Creek, Ohio (Holmes County, Ohio) is associated with such a story with the Native-Americans. Uncle Jacob Mast, emigrant in 1737 to Berks County, PA with Pioneer Jacob Beyeler (Beiler – with offspring named Byler, Beiler, and Boiler) and of the Northkill Amish-Mennonite settlement surely also had encounters with Native-Americans during the period 1737 to 1764, 1754 to 1763 being the period of the American French-Indian War. The land plots of Jacob Mast and Jacob Beiler in Berks County have been identified and were generally observed by some of us at a recent John and Jemima Hooley Mast (of Holmes Co, Ohio)/Beyeler/Kandel Reunion July 22 and 23 in Reading, PA. .. Besides the Pine Grove Cemetery near Elverson/Morgantown there is the Conestoga Valley Cemetery (a.k.a Mast Amish Cemetery near Morgantown – Churchtown, Lancaster Co., PA. There are at least 11 tombstones of Masts in this cemetery which I have twice observed in the last 8 years. .. C.Z. Mast, (1885-1974) author of the book “Mast Family History” in 1911 and age 26 at the publishing of the book was also a remarkable man. My friend Allen R. Beiler (still living) of New Holland, PA tells the story of the time when he picked tomatoes for C.Z. Mast when he was young. Christian Zook Mast was a very successful truck crop farmer in the Morgantown, PA area in his day. … On Facebook please find “John Mast of North Carolina”, brother of Bishop Jacob Mast to Randolph County, North Carolina. John Mast was a faithful follower of his Amish-Mennonite teaching and faith. He worshiped and lived in an area with members of the Friends (Quakers), Dunkards (Church of the Brethren), German Baptists, etc. as a pacifist. and was opposed to slavery. Some of his descendants such as his grandson, Reuben (not of the Amish/Mennonite faith), did have slaves which was alarming to some of the Mast family in North Carolina. Some of the Masts moved to the area further west in NC near Valle Crucis to get away from the growing pressure to have slaves. Some, (actually, many), moved out of NC to southwestern Ohio because of this growing influence of slave owning. There was a Mennonite Meeting House in Randolph Co, NC after John Mast moved to NC in 1761/1763.

  3. Melanie says:

    Thanks for a great blog posting, Jay! I am a direct descendant of John Mast, brother of Jacob Mast, through the marriage of his daughter Elizabeth to Leonard Eller. As always, I am at least 5 steps behind my distant cousin Don in finding Mast story footprints online!

    I enjoyed the photos posted with the information as well.

    • jayhack2012 says:

      If you or your cousin know of other notables that have something worth posting, please let me know. If either of you have content you would like to see posted, please let me know that, as well.

      • Donovan J. Beyeler says:

        In reply to your comments on Dec. 23, 2013, I’m not sure if you’re speaking of other notables of those with the Mast surname only, or if those notables may include other’s such as Pioneer Jacob Beiler. You are welcome to post material regarding Pioneer Jacob Beyeler (Beiler) from Guggisberg, Switzerland, immigrant of 1737 with Jacob Mast, uncle of Bishop Jacob Mast. I recently started a Facebook account called Beyeler Genealogy (Official Site) where various Beyeler, Beiler, Byler, Boiler, Beieler, and Beyler friends are participants or have material written about their ancestors. You are welcome to become a friend at that site and pull material from there as long as credit is given for the videos and photographs of mine. Donovan J. Beyeler

      • jayhack2012 says:

        Thanks. There is a lot of rich heritage among the Mast, Beiler, Hertzler, Hostettler and related families.

  4. Donovan J. Beyeler says:

    On Facebook there is a site called Descendants of Jacob Hochstetler (Official Site) if you may be interested. ((I have posted some material (comments, videos, photos) there)). There is quite a bit of information out there with regard to the Hostettler (Hochstetler, Hochstedler, Hostsetler, etc.) families.

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